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LumaFusion 2.0 review: More tracks, streamlined UI beef up mobile video editor

Mac World - 15 hours 33 min ago

iPadOS promises to bring improved multitasking, multiple windows from the same app, and support for SMB servers and external drives. That last one is of particular interest to mobile video editors, because it will enable access to video and audio content saved on USB hard drives and network-attached storage.

LumaTouch is poised to take advantage of this revolution with version 2.0 of LumaFusion, the company’s popular mobile video editing app.

Back on track

LumaFusion 2.0 improves upon everything that made the initial version great. First and foremost are the number of tracks, which have doubled to a maximum of six for video (including titles and graphics) with accompanying audio, plus another six for imported audio like music, sound effects, and voiceovers—a whopping 12 tracks of sound!

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QNAP HS-453DX NAS box review: The most powerful multimedia NAS box that money can buy

PC World - 15 hours 33 min ago
The QNAP HS-453DX is the most capable multimedia NAS box on the planet. But it's very pricey and just how useful its direct audio/video output will be depends on your setup. But it's not dead easy to use.

Samsung Galaxy A50 review: A $350 phone that gives Galaxy a whole new meaning

PC World - 15 hours 33 min ago

In no uncertain terms, there’s nothing about the $350 Galaxy A50 that’s only half as good as the $750 S10e. Quite frankly, there’s nothing about it that’s only 40 percent as good as the $900 S10, either. I know that’s not technically how pricing works, but when you have two phones from the same company that are priced so far apart, it’s only natural to compare them.

Unlike the Google Pixel 3a, which basically copied the Pixel 3 note for note with subtle downgrades to bring down the price, there are some major differences between the mid-range A50 and the premium Galaxy S10+. But the main similarities—a giant OLED display, triple-camera array, in-screen fingerprint sensor, and a selfie cutout—give the phones a remarkable kinship. They even have the same pretty, prism-inspired color options and IP68 water resistance.

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New Windows 10 build adds GPU temp monitoring, desktop renaming, and Settings updates

PC World - Fri, 2019-08-16 17:53

Users have been waiting for the first significant builds of the upcoming Windows 10 20H1 feature release to drop, and build 18963 is just that. It offers improvements to the Task Manager, Settings, Windows Search, and even your account picture. 

None of the new features should be considered barn-burners, but we haven’t seen this breadth of variety very often with the upcoming 20H1 release. (While the 20H1 release, due in the spring of 2020, is the “feature release,” Microsoft has said before that the 19H2 release due this fall will be built around optimizations and bug fixes.)

Here’s a list of what’s new, starting off with a feature designed for PC enthusiasts:

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Best gaming mice: Find your perfect match

PC World - Fri, 2019-08-16 16:49

The mouse is a simple tool: point and click. That’s it. But if you’re a PC gamer, you know that pushing virtual paper around on your desktop isn’t the same as fragging bots and shooting zombies. (Not even remotely.) 

What’s more, picking the right gaming mouse is an intensely personal decision. Every little detail—its overall shape and size, the shape and placement its buttons, its cable (or lack thereof), its weight, its materials—can change how you feel about it. More than any other peripheral, a mouse is the hardest to recommend, because there is no objectively perfect mouse. Everyone’s hands are different.

That said, we can guide you on your search. Below are our recommendations for gaming mice, built on years of experience first and foremost as gamers, and second as writers here at PCWorld. 

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Siri and Spotify is nice and all, but here’s why Apple should let us customize iOS default apps

Mac World - Fri, 2019-08-16 16:00

iOS 13 is just a few weeks away, and Spotify fans might be in for a treat. Thanks to the launch of SiriKit, The Information reports that the Apple Music competitor is in talks with Apple to let users control Spotify music playback with Siri without jumping through any AirPlay hoops, which could change iOS in a big way.

But I say, why stop there? On Thursday, 9to5Mac’s Ben Lovejoy responded with a strong editorial arguing that Apple should let users set Spotify as the default music player for all of iOS. But if Apple lets users choose the default music player, then it should let users choose the default apps for email, navigation, and web browsing. Allowing such customization may end up bringing more people into the fold.

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How to get a Safari password to save it in a password manager

Mac World - Fri, 2019-08-16 08:00

Apple has been a fantastic promoter of better password security by suggesting strong passwords and auto-filling them in Safari for macOS and iOS. These passwords are long, complex, automatically stored, stored securely, and—if you have iCloud Keychain—synchronized across all your devices linked to the same iCloud account that also have iCloud Keychain enabled.

However, there’s one small flaw: Third-party password managers in Safari for macOS won’t pick up the entered password and offer to store it for you in their database. I rely on 1Password, and there are a few other highly regarded password-management systems that have features that stretch beyond the strong but limited options with Safari and iCloud Keychain.

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Traveling with Apple tech: What soars, what falls flat

Mac World - Fri, 2019-08-16 07:00

Travel has a way of opening your eyes to new possibilities. For the last three weeks, I’ve been away from home, spending time in a few European countries. During this trip, I found myself thinking about the different ways that we use technology when we’re outside of our daily routine, and how it brings to light not only things that work well, but also the areas where there’s still a decent amount of friction.

As I’ve been making the rounds, I’ve made note of a few places where I think Apple technologies have worked particularly well, as well as where there’s some room for improvement.

Contactless payments

If this trip has drilled home one thing, it’s that contactless payments are king. Apple Pay has been a godsend—it’s even easier than digging out your card and fumbling with an unfamiliar system. It’s clearer than ever that digital payments are the way of the future and, if anything, it’s a future where the U.S. is still lagging behind.

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Swiftpoint Z review: Would you spend $230 on a mouse?

PC World - Fri, 2019-08-16 06:30

Would you spend $200 on a mouse? Should you spend $200 on a mouse? Always a fan of gloriously pricey peripherals, I recently took the Swiftpoint Z for a spin to find out. At $230 list, I’m pretty sure it’s the most expensive mouse I’ve ever used—and it certainly tries to justify that price with a laundry list of experimental features. (Note: As of this writing, Amazon is selling the Swiftpoint Z for $150.)

Or gimmicks, if you’re feeling less generous.

Let’s get into it though. If nothing else, the Swiftpoint Z is at least the most interesting mouse I’ve ever laid hands on. Get ready to rethink every assumption you’ve ever had about how a mouse should function.

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Deep Sentinel Home Security review: More than just cameras that document crime, this system actively deters it

Mac World - Fri, 2019-08-16 06:00
Real people monitor these security cameras on your behalf, and they'll let any potential intruder know they're being watched.

Deep Sentinel Home Security review: More than just cameras that document crime, this system actively deters it

PC World - Fri, 2019-08-16 06:00
Real people monitor these security cameras on your behalf, and they'll let any potential intruder know they're being watched.

Why the lower clock speeds on Intel's 10th-gen Ice Lake CPUs aren't a disaster

PC World - Fri, 2019-08-16 06:00

Despite what’s been said for years about CPUs, megahertz still matters. So just how much should you be freaked out at the lower clock frequencies of Intel’s new 10th-gen Ice Lake CPUs? The answer goes beyond simple numbers.

The issue, of course, is the lackadaisical top clock speed of Intel’s fastest 10th-gen Ice Lake Core i7-1065G7 CPU: 3.9GHz. Compared to the 8th-gen Core i7-8565U’s 4.6GHz, the Ice Lake part is nearly 15 percent slower. It gives up a full 900MHz over the less common 8th gen Core i7-8665U, too. 

Although many things contribute to a CPU’s performance, including its micro-architecture as well as thermal and power constraints, overall press previews (including our own early benchmarks)  were generally favorable considering—wait for it—Ice Lake’s lower clock speed. Still, the response from many has been along the lines of, “is that all you got?” 

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Best antivirus for Mac: Protect yourself from malicious software

Mac World - Thu, 2019-08-15 17:28

Macs may be a far less tempting target for malware and viruses, but they’re not immune from attack. Even if you don’t care about adware or being used as a means to infect users on other platforms, it’s still possible to fall victim to ransomware, password theft, or stolen iPhone backups.

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Best antivirus for Mac: Protect yourself from malicious software

PC World - Thu, 2019-08-15 17:28
We name the top free and paid Mac antivirus products to root out malicious software and prevent infections.

Record crowd for Triggs Lecture Series

Brock News - Thu, 2019-08-15 14:15

MEDIA RELEASE: 15 August 2019 – R00130

It was an opportunity to talk about key issues in the wine industry in two provinces.

The Triggs International Premium Vinifera Lecture Series, held every two years and organized by Brock University’s Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI), took place over two days last week in Ontario’s Niagara region and again on Tuesday, Aug. 13 and Wednesday, Aug. 14 in B.C.’s Okanagan Valley.

More than 200 grape growers and wine industry professionals attended over the four days to discuss disease pressures and attend a lecture with Vaughn Bell, Senior Scientist at the New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research.

“Hosting an international viticulture expert in key winemaking regions in Ontario and British Columbia allows our growers and winemakers to collaboratively discuss strategies to further advance and grow the industry on a national level,” said CCOVI Director Debbie Inglis. “Vaughn shared a wealth of knowledge about vineyard health and insect vector management strategies taking place at home and abroad.”

Bell said he was honoured to be selected as the featured speaker and said it was clear the researchers, and the specialized equipment and technology at their disposal, have made many positive advances toward helping the wine sector achieve economic sustainability goals.

“I was impressed with the spirit of co-operation that exists between CCOVI and the wine sector,” said Bell. “From my experience in New Zealand, positive collaborations inevitably deliver the best results in the shortest possible timelines to those with a financial stake in the wine sector.”

Bell visited three vineyards in Niagara-on-the-Lake on the first day of the series, discussing vineyard health and disease pressures. The next day, he summarized the discussions held during the vineyard tours in a public lecture at Brock’s Pond Inlet.

After his stop in Ontario, he headed to B.C. for the second leg of the series.

“The level of awareness around the interaction between vineyard disease and the insects that spread it has developed significantly since my last visit in February 2018,” Bell said. “That’s all credit to your sector leaders and those funded by the sector to bring about positive change.”

To ensure the national lecture series continues to be held in two key wine-producing regions, BASF Canada, a company that provides crop protection products, again sponsored the event.

“BASF is pleased to be able to continue our support of the Triggs Lecture Series and to give it its national scope,” said Tom Clarke, Horticultural Specialist at BASF Canada for the Niagara region. “It is important for all of us to work together and I think the discussions between Dr. Bell and the growers who attended were very productive when it comes to further developing our industry.”

Launched in 2004, with a generous donation from Donald and Elaine Triggs, the lecture series was created to provide industry stakeholders, researchers and students access to the most current developments in the field of viticulture.

The lecture series is further supported by the Grape Growers of Ontario, Lakeview Vineyard Equipment, VineTech Canada, British Columbia Wine Grape Council, Summerland Research and Development Innovation Centre, and the following wineries: Henry of Pelham Family Estate, Andrew Peller Ltd., Tinhorn Creek, Quails’ Gate Estate Winery and Mission Hill Family Estate.

For anyone unable to attend, the Ontario and B.C. public lecture slides, as well as a video of the Ontario public lecture, are available on CCOVI’s website.

For more information or for assistance arranging interviews:

* Britt Dixon, Communications Officer, Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute, Brock University bdixon@brocku.ca, 905-688-5550 x4471

* Dan Dakin, Manager Communications and Media Relations, Brock University ddakin@brocku.ca, 905-688-5550 x5353 or 905-347-1970

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Apple’s event calendar: When is the next Apple event?

Mac World - Thu, 2019-08-15 14:15

Updated 08/15/19: Apple is expected to announce new iPhones and a new Apple Watch in September, likely on September 10 or 11.

Apple doesn’t often participate in big industry-wide events like CES or E3. The most valuable company in the world holds its own events, thank you very much. Several times a year, Apple invites the press and industry professionals out to a theater to hear all about its latest products and services. Apple calls these “Special Events,” and streams them online to its millions of fans.

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Microsoft's privacy policy admits contractors listen to Cortana, Skype recordings

PC World - Thu, 2019-08-15 13:43

Microsoft’s updated privacy policy acknowledges that the company is allowing humans to listen to recordings made by Cortana and other speech services, and the company has not yet allowed customers to opt out.

Microsoft’s privacy issues follow similar problems with Google’s Assistant as well as Apple, where contractors revealed that humans are allowed access to snippets of recorded conversations to improve the performance of the respective devices. Vice’s Motherboard also revealed similar practices going on at Microsoft, specifically with regards to Skype and Cortana. 

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Pre-binned Ryzen 3000 CPU listings reveal the limits of AMD overclocking potential

PC World - Thu, 2019-08-15 11:38

AMD designed its Ryzen 3000 processors to milk out every possible ounce of performance, leaving very little room for enthusiasts to push the pedal even closer to the metal. That’s the key takeaway from Case King and Silicon Lottery listings for pre-binned chips with guaranteed all-core overclocking headroom.

Both sites validate their chips in-house and then sell them at a premium for their guaranteed minimum overclocking potential, so the faster the chip, the more you pay. The Case King offerings are tested by renowned overclocker Roman “der8auer” Hartung, as Anandtech points out. Most of the available chips have already been gobbled up, but the listings themselves provide deeper insight into AMD’s strategy.

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8 ways the iMac changed computing

Mac World - Thu, 2019-08-15 11:27

Editor’s note: 21 years ago today, Apple officially released the iMac. To commemorate the anniversary, we are reposting this article that originally appeared on the iMac’s tenth anniversary on August 15, 2008.

The iMac made an instant impression when Apple first unveiled it in May 1998. But it didn’t start to really shake things up unitl it began to ship—which happened on August 15, 1998. Arguably the most influential desktop computer of the last decade, the original iMac’s specifications seem quaint by today’s standards. For $1,299, you came home with a 233MHz PowerPC G3 processor, 32MB of RAM, a 4GB hard drive, a 15-inch built-in monitor, and stereo speakers—all in an amazingly stylish case.

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Google Assistant can now remind other people to do things you don’t want to do

PC World - Thu, 2019-08-15 10:12

Setting a reminder is one of the most useful things you can do with Google Assistant on your phone or smart speaker, especially if you’re the forgetful type. But a new feature rolling out to Assistant will make reminders even more useful, so much so that you won’t have to do the remembering.

Instead of asking Google Assistant to set a reminder for you, you’ll now be able to set one for someone else in your family or household. So, instead of saying, “Hey Google, remind me to take out the trash on Sunday,” you’ll be able to say, “Hey Google, remind Susan to take out the track on Sunday.” Then, the notification will appear on their phone or smart speaker at the specified time.

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