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5 things the iPad Pro should steal from the Pixel Slate (and 3 things it shouldn’t)

Mac World - Thu, 2018-11-29 09:00

The iPad Pro’s closest competitor has arrived. Google’s Pixel Slate is a 12.3-inch Chrome OS-based tablet with slim bezels, no home button, USB-C support, lots of magnets, and a $200 companion keyboard. But for all of their similarities, the Pixel Slate and iPad Pro are quite different. Here are a few things Apple’s should “borrow” from the Pixel Slate for the next revision (and a few it should pass on).

5 things the iPad Pro should steal from the Pixel Slate A second USB port

Like the iPad Pro, the Pixel Slate’s only connection is USB-C (there’s no headphone jack), but Google does Apple one better by adding a second port. No matter which side your outlet is on, you’ll be able to plug in without wrapping the wire around the screen. Google also positions the ports on the bottom rather than the center of the edge, so it looks much nicer when plugged in.

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5 things the iPad Pro should steal from the Pixel Slate (and 3 things it shouldn’t)

PC World - Thu, 2018-11-29 09:00
As its closest competitor, there are a few things the iPad Pro could learn from the Pixel Slate, as well as a number of things it should ignore.

CleanMyMac X review: Tune-up Mac app hampered by its malware detection

Mac World - Thu, 2018-11-29 08:00

CleanMyMac X is MacPaw’s catch-all software crud and gunk remover for the Mac. This version swings for the fences, with new features such as a malware scanner, extensions manager, and a universal updater for all of your application programs. This is in addition to CleanMyMac X’s core functions, which include tools for smart cleanup, system junk, mail attachments, iTunes junk, trash bins, a large and old files scanner, privacy scanner, and application uninstaller.

IDG

CleanMyMac X's new menu bar menu.

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Couldn’t have said it better: Rumors don’t doom Apple

Mac World - Thu, 2018-11-29 07:00

You can’t swing a 30-pin dock connector cable these days without hitting a pundit wailing about the Apple doom that the current swath rumors of iPhone production cuts must mean.

Not that The Macalope is suggesting you should do that.

If anyone is watching.

Anyway, while the furry one maintains that you can’t trust these thinly-sourced supply chain rumors, there are seemingly a lot more thinly-sourced supply chain rumors this year than in previous years. Is it smoke or are analysts just smelling burnt toast again? When you add in a particularly bad turn in the market overall and the threat of tariffs on products made in China and, yeah, #AAPL is down quite a bit.

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How to create Excel macros and automate your spreadsheets

PC World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:35

Excel macros are like mini-programs that perform repetitive tasks, saving you a lot of time and typing. For example, it takes Excel less than one-tenth of a second to calculate an entire, massive spreadsheet. It’s the manual operations that slow you down. That’s why you need macros to combine all of these chores into a single one-second transaction.

Excel macros: Tips for getting started

We’re going to show you how to write your first macro. Once you see how easy it is to automate tasks using macros, you’ll never go back. 

First, some tips on how to prepare your data for macros:

  • Always begin your macro at the Home position (use the key combination Ctrl+ Home to get there quickly).
  • Use the directional keys to navigate: Up, Down, Right, Left, End, Home, etc., and shortcut keys to expedite movement.
  • Keep your macros small and focused on specific tasks. This is best for testing and editing (if needed). You can always combine these mini-macros into one BIG macro later once they’re perfected.
  • Macros require “relative” cell addresses, which means you “point” to the cells rather than hard-code the actual (or “absolute”) cell address (such as A1, B19, C20, etc.) in the macro. Spreadsheets are dynamic, which means they constantly change, which means the cell addresses change.
  • Fixed values and static information such as names, addresses, ID numbers, etc. are generally entered in advance and not really part of your macro. Because this data rarely changes (and if it does, it’s just to add or remove a new record), it’s almost impossible to include this function in a macro.
  • Manage your data first: Add, edit, or delete records, then enter the updated values. Then you can execute your macro.
Why starting with mini-macros is easier

For this example, we have a store owner who has expanded her territory from a single store to a dozen in 12 different major cities. Now the CEO, she’s been managing her own books for years, which wasn’t an easy task for a single store, and now she has 12. She has to collect data from each store and merge it to monitor the health of her entire company.

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Kangaroo Motion Sensor review: This home security system only goes halfway

Mac World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:00
This home security system sure sounds inexpensive, but it's no bargain.

Amazon's eye for sports could shatter TV as we know it

Mac World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:00
Amazon buying regional Fox Sports networks could fulfill our a la carte sports dreams, but at a cost.

How an Apple TV stick could make Apple’s video streaming service an instant hit

Mac World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:00

You might have missed it between all the turkey brining and Black Friday sales, but last week The Information reported that Apple considered making a tiny AppleTV “stick” similar to those made by competitors like Amazon and Roku.

Up to now, Apple has been steadfast in holding the line on Apple TV pricing. When the company introduced the Apple TV 4K, it didn’t even drop the price on the fourth-generation model—they’re still both for sale, at starting prices of $149 and $179 respectively.

Compare that to the competition: You can buy a Fire TV Stick for $40 and a 4K version for $50, and comparable devices from Roku cost $30 and $40, respectively. Yes, these sticks are underpowered compared to Apple’s box—Roku’s Apple TV equivalent box is $100—but no matter how you measure it, Apple’s not competitive in the TV box market when it comes to price.

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Kangaroo Motion Sensor review: This home security system only goes halfway

PC World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:00
This home security system sure sounds inexpensive, but it's no bargain.

Amazon's eye for sports could shatter TV as we know it

PC World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:00
Amazon buying regional Fox Sports networks could fulfill our a la carte sports dreams, but at a cost.

What's behind the weird RAM amounts on some PCs: The confusing blend with Optane Memory

PC World - Thu, 2018-11-29 06:00

When does a PC have “24GB of Memory?” When its Intel Optane Memory is being counted on top of the 4GB, 8GB, or 16GB of RAM we’re used to seeing on mainstream PCs.

Traditional RAM and Optane Memory do different things, however, so the fact that some PCs are showing this blended spec is bound to confuse shoppers looking for new PCs over the holidays. We’ve taken a closer look at what’s being advertised and how to understand what the PC you’re shopping for really has. 

Sam’s Club

Is it OK to market laptops with total “memory” by counting the Optane drive too?

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HideIPVPN review: Great if you need a speedy connection via Germany

Mac World - Wed, 2018-11-28 19:03
HideIPVPN is easy to use, but its performance leaves a lot to be desired.

HideIPVPN review: Great if you need a speedy connection via Germany

PC World - Wed, 2018-11-28 19:03
HideIPVPN in brief:
  • P2P allowed: Yes, on select servers
  • Business location: USA and Moldova
  • Number of servers: 29
  • Number of country locations: 11
  • Cost: $70 (billed annually)
  • VPN protocol: OpenVPN
  • Data encryption: AES-256
  • Data authentication: SHA 256
  • Handshake encryption: RSA 2048

Editor’s Note: This review was updated on November 7, 2018 to reflect changes to the HideIPVPN desktop app for Windows, improved speed scores, and a change to the review score.

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Cyber Week Steal: Get The Insta360 Nano S iPhone VR Camera For Over 30% Off

Mac World - Wed, 2018-11-28 15:41

For decades, photos and videos were the best mediums to share your travel experiences with your friends and family. However, VR takes this to the extreme by giving your loved ones a 360° view of your surroundings. Your iPhone alone can’t capture VR footage and images, but with this handy Insta360 Nano S VR Camera, you can turn your iPhone into a VR content creation device.

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Cyber Week Steal: Save 85% On This Complete Arduino Starter Kit & Course Bundle

PC World - Wed, 2018-11-28 15:40

Admit it: At some point in your life, you've likely imagined how much easier it would be to have a personal robot or array of gadgets at your disposal—that is until you consider the hassle of going to school for an engineering degree. But now, thanks to the Arduino platform, virtually anyone can make their own robots, wearables, and more—no degree required. You can get started with the Complete Arduino Starter Kit & Course Bundle, on sale for only $72 today with code CMSAVE20.

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Report: Apple Watch Series 4 ECG coming in watchOS 5.1.2

Mac World - Wed, 2018-11-28 14:33

The Apple Watch Series 4 is Apple’s biggest upgrade for its popular wearable to date, but we’re still waiting for one of its marquee features. In September, Apple made a big deal about the device’s ability to perform an electrocardiogram—abbreviated as ECG or EKG—for your heart by putting your finger on the crown and waiting for 30 seconds. It might be the Series 4’s coolest new trick, but it has perpetually been listed as “coming later this year,” and the year is coming to a close.

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Samsung Galaxy Book 2 tablet review: Performance takes a back seat to battery life

PC World - Wed, 2018-11-28 14:26

Give Samsung credit: the Galaxy Book 2 boldly breaks from the first-generation Galaxy Book on both the inside and outside. The company’s new 2-in-1 not only ditches its flimsy folding keyboard in favor of a more traditional tablet kickstand, but also joins the small ranks of PCs that have adopted a battery-sipping Qualcomm Snapdragon microprocessor. Performance suffers drastically, however, even as battery life soars to an unprecedented 18 hours.

The Galaxy Book 2 boasts Samsung’s terrific AMOLED displays and rich sound, with LTE capability, a pen and a keyboard, all sold for a reasonable $999Remove non-product link In addition to the CPU switch, though, the second generation makes some compromises. The built-in 4GB of memory and 128GB of storage is a bit skimpy, for instance, and the OS—Windows 10 Home in S Mode—might turn some off. For basic work on the road, the Galaxy Book 2 offers some compelling arguments. But the experience is still too bumpy to recommend to everyone.

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Akitio NT2 U31C review: An easy and fast 10Gbps USB RAID enclosure (for hard drives)

PC World - Wed, 2018-11-28 13:07

Akitio’s NT2 U31C offers mega-storage for people without mega-bucks. Sure, the privileged few may shell out for the uber-speed of Thunderbolt 3, but for most of us, USB 3.1 still reigns. You could opt for one of the many portable USB 3.1 hard drives (5Gbps Gen 1 types—10Gbps Gen 2 is overkill for platter-based media) if your needs are simple, or if you want faster throughput, a Gen 2 portable SSD. But if you want more storage that those options provide, then a desktop RAID box running a couple of today’s capacious 3.5-inch hard drives is what you want. 

Specs and design

The NT2 U31C is a dual-bay enclosure of minimal size—for a box that can hold two 3.5-inch hard drives, that is: approximately 7.2 inches long by 4.8 inches high, by 3.2 inches wide. The two drive bays are hidden behind a lockable, slide-off faceplate, and don’t require adapters or tools for 3.5-inch drives—just slide them in.

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Google Fi wireless service now works with iPhones and most Android phones, but there’s a catch

PC World - Wed, 2018-11-28 12:21

Look out Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile, there’s a new carrier in town. Google is opening up its Project Fi nationwide wireless service to way more phones, including the hottest iPhones, Galaxy phones, and GSM-only Android phones of the year. But, sadly, you won’t be getting the full Fi experience.

To mark the expansion, Google has renamed the service to Google Fi (or just Fi for short), because it’s no longer a project. It’s now a real-deal network, using three mobile 4G LTE networks and more than two million secure Wi-Fi hotspots to create a blanket of coverage.

Where the service was previously limited to a handful of handsets designed for Fi—namely Pixels, the Moto G6, and a couple LG ThinQ phones—the new service expands availability to phones made by Samsung, Huawei, Nokia, Essential, Apple, and others. And it’s not just the newest handsets either—compatibility goes all the way back to the Galaxy S6 and iPhone 5S and SE.

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Google Fi wireless service now works with iPhones and most Android phones, but there’s a catch

Mac World - Wed, 2018-11-28 12:21
Google has opened and rebranded its Project Fi service to work on nearly every phone available, but you're really only getting T-Mobile service.

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